Bruckner / Orf Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra: Symphony No. 4 (1888)

Bruckner / Orf Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra: Symphony No. 4 (1888)

Bruckner / Orf Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra: Symphony No. 4 (1888)

Format: CD

Regular price $21.99
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Title: Symphony No. 4 (1888)
Artist: Bruckner / Orf Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra
Label: Capriccio
Product Type: COMPACT DISCS
UPC: 845221080857
Genre: Classical Artists

?Bruckner's frantic revisions of his symphonies Nos. 3, 4, and 8 were borne out of his disappointment with Hermann Levi rejecting the original version of the 8th symphony. Helping in this large-scale revamping effort were former Bruckner-students Franz and Joseph Schalk, Ferdinand Löwe, Max von Oberleithner, and Cyrill Hynai, which resulted in these versions' reputation - and especially that of the last version of the 4th - being varnished as something not quite Echt-Bruckner. It wasn't until the discovery of photographs of the 1888 version's manuscript score and the subsequent publication of Benjamin Korstvedt's edition thereof that it became clear: This late edition really did reflect Bruckner's intentions. To ears familiar with the still better-known 1881 version, the result might sound mystifying, even troubling, but it also surprises with many particularly exquisite passages!

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